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Martin Luther King, Jr

Currency:USD Category:Collectibles / Autographs Start Price:NA Estimated At:6,000.00 - 8,000.00 USD
Martin Luther King, Jr

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Auction Date:2010 Aug 11 @ 22:00 (UTC-5 : EST/CDT)
Location:5 Rt 101A Suite 5, Amherst, New Hampshire, 03031, United States
ALS - Autograph Letter Signed
ANS - Autograph Note Signed
AQS - Autograph Quotation Signed
AMQS - Autograph Musical Quotation Signed
DS - Document Signed
FDC - First Day Cover
Inscribed - “Personalized”
ISP - Inscribed Signed Photograph
LS - Letter Signed
SP - Signed Photograph
TLS - Typed Letter Signed
TLS signed “Martin L. King, Jr.,” two pages, 8.5 x 11, Southern Christian Leadership Conference letterhead, October 29, 1963. Letter to Reverend Thomas L. Chapin of the First Presbyterian Church. In full: “This letter comes to express my deep appreciation to you and the members of First Presbyterian Church for your Generous contribution of $115.64 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Such moral and financial support are of inestimable value for the continuance of our humble efforts. Without your dollars for freedom, the Conference would be unable to work effectively toward its goal of the full integration of the Negro into all aspects of American life. Your contribution will help our work in Birmingham and all across the South. At present, SCLC has staff members in more than 20 communities seeking through non-violent direct action and voter registration campaigns to break down the barriers of racial segregation and discrimination.

Without your moral support we would be caught in a dungeon of despair without knowing that many people all over the nation are supporting us in our struggle. By aiding us in this significant way, you are telling world that the rithts [sic] of Negroes cannot be trampled in any community without impairing the rights of every other American.

Thank you again for making our financial problems a little less burdensome. I am confident that if we continue to gain this type of support, this sweltering summer of discontent can be transformed into an invigorating autumn of Justice and freedom for all people. We are enclosing an official receipt for your contribution.”

In fine condition, with staple hole and light creasing to top left corner, a mild shade of toning to first page, and an office notation to first page.

The SCLC’s most compelling fight against racial injustice came in Birmingham in 1963. Like most cities in the Deep South, Birmingham was completely segregated—a sad fact the SCLC sought to change via a citywide campaign of civil disobedience aimed at desegregation. To that end, Dr. King was grateful for any support—financial and otherwise—that the conference could muster. “Your contribution will help our work in Birmingham and all across the South,” King thankfully notes, adding “we would be caught in a dungeon of despair without knowing that many people all over the nation are supporting us in our struggle.”

Working toward ending that struggle would mean that “this sweltering summer of discontent can be transformed into an invigorating autumn of Justice and freedom for all people.” The most dramatic moments of the Birmingham campaign came in May, when more than 1,000 black children left school to join the demonstrations, with hundreds being arrested. The following day, 2,500 more students joined and were met by police dogs and high-pressure fire hoses. Public outrage led to the involvement of the Kennedy Administration and the desegregation of downtown businesses. A reflective letter letter referencing one of the most well-known battles in the civil rights fight.