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Franklin Silver Mining Company of Colorado, 1869 Issued Bond.

Currency:USD Category:Coins & Paper Money / Stock & Bond - Certificates Start Price:250.00 USD Estimated At:325.00 - 500.00 USD
Franklin Silver Mining Company of Colorado, 1869 Issued Bond.
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Territory of Colorado, March 20th, 1869, $100, 10% Coupon Bond, gold ink on white paper, mining and mill scene in middle, Colorado arms at right, and portrait of Benjamin Franklin at bottom middle. Signed by Benjamin Franklin Fisher, (1834-1915), Civil War Soldier, Officer, Lawyer and war hero. He enlisted on June 18, 1861, the first summer of the Civil War, for three years in Company H, 32nd Pennsylvania Volunteers, being formed in Bucks County. (Two brothers also served, one as an assistant surgeon and the second as a Lieutenant who was killed at the Wilderness in 1864.) He then joined the Army of the Potomac for the Peninsula Campaign in the Signal Corp., he saw action at LeeÍs Mill, Williamsburg, GainesÍs Mill, and Malvern Hill. In 1862, he was appointed Chief Signal Officer of the Army of the Potomac to produce intelligence reports from ñstations of observationî and from the saddle. As the battle of Chancellorsville was concluding, and Union forces were under orders to make every effort to learn where enemy forces were going next. On June 17, 1863, while shadowing Confederate columns near Aldie, Virginia, Capt. Fisher was captured and sent to Libby Prison in Richmond. On February 9, 1864, 109 prisoners tunneled out of Libby Prison. Fisher led the second party of ten, which included his future brother-in-law, Lt. Causten. Fisher evaded searchers for eleven days, and found his way to Union lines at Williamsburg. Brevetted Lieutenant-colonel for gallant and meritorious services in 1864, Fisher was with the Army of the Potomac from the Rapidan to Petersburg. After the war, Fisher practiced law in Philadelphia and was active in many financial ventures including mining. Historic stock certificate signed by the last surviving escapee of notorious Libby Prison.