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Graeme Priddle | Mangopare

Currency:USD Category:Art / Medium - Wood Start Price:50.00 USD Estimated At:NA
Graeme Priddle | Mangopare
All items are original, and signed by the artist(s).
Graeme Priddle
Asheville, North Carolina

Mangopare, 2017
Walnut, maple, acrylic paint
5 x 6 x 6 inches | 12.7 x 15.24 x 15.24 cm

Mangopare: Hammerhead shark - Sphyrna zygaena

In Maori culture the Mangopare is the symbol for strength and agility and is most often represented in Kowhaiwhai (repetitive patterns), on the tahu (ridgepole) or heke (rafters) in Wharenui (meeting houses). These painted patterns represent tribal genealogy and environment and differ from tribe to tribe. As many tribes live on or close to the coast one of the most common patterns is mangopare (hammerhead shark). The traditional colors of Kowhaiwhai are red to represent warmth, blood and life, white to represent purity, promise for the future, an awakening and black to represent the earth. These colors were obtained by mixing natural pigments with shark oil.
Shark fins are prized as a delicacy in certain countries in Asia, and overfishing is putting many hammerhead sharks at risk of extinction. Cruel fishermen who harvest the animals typically cut off the fins and toss the remainder of the fish, which is often still alive, back into the sea. This practice, known as finning, is lethal to the shark and we should fight to put an end to this practice!
Kia mate mangopare kei mate wheke! (Never give up, fight to the end!)

The main element of this piece is a turned sphere which represents the earth that is home to wonderful creatures that are cruelly being driven to extinction. The sphere is carved/textured in my take on a traditional Maori pattern representing Mangopare (Hammerhead sharks) which are threatened by 'finning.' The base is turned to represent the ocean, my favorite place to be, which in many places is also being threatened by human exploitation and lack of care.

About the Artist
Graeme Priddle has over 20 years experience in the woodworking field, best known for his sculptural turnings/carvings reflecting his life and environments in Northland, New Zealand. He has won numerous awards for his work, which has been exhibited widely in New Zealand, UK, Japan, Taiwan, France, Germany, U.S.A and Canada. He is very active in the wood turning world and commits his time and talent to many creative endeavours. He has served on the committee of the New Zealand National Association of Woodturners for five years as well as being instrumental in establishing the New Zealand ‘CollaboratioNZ’ Conferences in 1998. Graeme has demonstrated and taught for numerous woodworking and woodturning groups and at many woodworking events throughout the world.

Learn more: www.graemepriddle.com